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Patricia Phillippy
Department of English Literature
School of Humanities
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Penrhyn Road
Kingston University
Kingston Upon Thames
Surrey KT1 2EE

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Publications

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Will Brooker, Forever Stardust: David Bowie Across the Universe (I.B.Tauris, 2016)

Professor Will Brooker’s new monograph Forever Stardust: David Bowie Across the Universe is the first full-length study of Bowie’s entire artistic career across various media. Rather than a conventional, chronological survey, it offers a close analysis of the themes, patterns and motifs that structure Bowie’s work. Forever Stardust is the result of Brooker’s unique, year-long process that involved immersing himself in the culture, places and experiences that shaped Bowie throughout his life, and attracted international media attention.

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Caroline Potter, Erik Satie, A Parisian Composer and His Life (Boydell & Brewer, 2016)

Erik Satie's (1866–1925) music appeals to wide audiences and has influenced both experimental artists and pop musicians. His music was created in Paris in one of the most exciting periods in European cultural history and he collaborated with many artists and writers. Erik Satie, A Parisian Composer and His World situates Satie’s work within the context and sonic environment of contemporary Paris. The book was named Sunday Times Classical Music Book of the Year 2016.

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Sara Upstone: Rethinking Race and Identity in Contemporary British Fiction (Routledge, 2016)

Sara Upstone: Rethinking Race and Identity in Contemporary British Fiction examines how contemporary novelists have utilised a utopian politics of form in order to advance speculative visions of a post-racial twenty-first century Britain. Discussing a range of authors including Zadie Smith, Alan Hollinghurst, Jon McGregor, Jackie Kay and Maggie Gee it offers a wide ranging and up to date discussion of the myriad ways in which authors are intervening into debates surrounding race in Britain today.

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Marisa Linton, Choosing Terror: Virtue, Friendship and Authenticity in the French Revolution (Oxford University Press, 2013)

Choosing Terror is a study of the Jacobin leaders in the French Revolution. It casts new light on a perennial problem: what causes people in certain circumstances to choose terror? This study of revolutionary political culture is informed by ideas about experience, emotion, agency, gender, and the self. It allows readers to understand the Jacobin leaders not just as articulators of ideology but as people faced with terrible choices in their own lives.

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Caroline Potter, ed.'Erik Satie: Music, Art and Literature (Ashgate Press, 2013)

Erik Satie (1866-1925) was a quirky, innovative and enigmatic composer whose impact has spread far beyond the musical world. As an artist active in several spheres – from cabaret to religion, from calligraphy to poetry and playwriting – and collaborator with some of the leading avant-garde figures of the day, including Jean Cocteau, Pablo Picasso, Serge Diaghilev and René Clair, he is one of few genuinely cross-disciplinary composers. This book covers all aspects of Satie's creativity and features chapters by Kingston authors Caroline Potter, Helen Julia Minors and PhD student Grace Wai Kwan Gates.

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Nicola Phillips, The Profligate Son; Or, A true story of Family Conflict, Fashionable Vice and Financial Ruin in Regency England (Oxford University Press & Basic Books, New York, 2013)

In Regency England a profligate son was regarded as every parent's worst nightmare: he symbolized the dangerous temptations of a new consumer society and the failure of parents to instil moral, sexual, and financial self-control in their sons. This book combines a story of the embattled relationship between a teenage boy and his father with historical research into early nineteenth-century family conflict, and social and cultural attitudes towards sexuality, credit, debt, and the criminal justice system in Britain.

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Karen Lipsedge, Domestic Space in Eighteenth-Century British Novels (Palgrave, 2012)

This book focuses on six novels: Richardson's three novels, Pamela; The History of Clarissa Harlowe and The History of Sir Charles Grandison; Haywood's The History of Miss Betsy Thoughtless; Sheridan's Memoirs of Miss Sidney Bidulph, and Burney's Evelina. At the heart of these novels is the Georgian house and garden of the polite élite; specifically, the heroine's experience of the domestic life of her living space. This book argues that to make the houses and gardens represented in these novels accessible to the modern reader, he or she needs to have information of the 'real' domestic. By recreating the structure, design, function and social significance of specific rooms and garden buildings, and the ways of life they facilitated, Domestic Space in Eighteenth-Century British Novels does more than just provides that information. This book brings the fictional domestic interior to life for the modern reader.

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Helen Julia Minors, ed., Music, Text and Translation (Bloomsbury, 2012)

Essays in this collection expand the notion of translation across all forms of artistic expression and combine theory and practice. The volume has led to a successful AHRC network, Translating Music, which explores the interpersonal, intercultural, interdisciplinary, intralinguistic and interlinguistic bridges on which music and translation intersect. Project partners include the Royal Opera House, English National Opera and Deluxe Media.

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Will Brooker, Hunting the Dark Knight: Twenty-first Century Batman (I B Tauris, 2012)

Will Brooker's most recent monograph engages with the last decade of Batman texts - including Grant Morrison's comic books and Christopher Nolan's films - through theories of authorship, adaptation and intertextuality. Can we speak of an 'author' within the collaborative forms of comics and cinema, or is Barthes' concept of the 'scriptor' more appropriate? How do theories of adaptation relate to a film that draws on 70 years of comic book continuity? What cultural understandings and structures govern the discourses of 'realism' in Batman narratives, and how do they relate to representations of heterosexual masculinity? Brooker's final two chapters use Bakhtin's theories of carnival and dialogism to explore the relationship between Batman and Joker, and then apply Derridean tools of deconstruction to the key oppositions at the heart of Batman's mythos, and in turn, the binaries of law and chaos, homo- and heterosexuality, war and terror, theatricality and realism, that structure our broader culture.

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Isabella van Elferen, Gothic Music: The Sounds of the Uncanny (University of Chicago Press, 2012)

Gothic Music: The Sounds of the Uncanny traces sonic Gothic from the echoing footsteps in Gothic novels to the dark soundscapes of Goth club nights. This broad perspective importantly widens the scope of Gothic music from Goth subculture to literature, film, television and video games. This book also provides the musical and theoretical definition of Gothic music that lacks in current scholarship. Whether voicing the spectral beings of early cinema, announcing virtual terrors in video games, or intensifying the nocturnal rituals of Goth, Gothic music represents the sounds of the uncanny.

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Patricia Phillippy, ed., Elizabeth Cooke Hoby Russell, The Writings of an English Sappho (CRRS/Iter, 2011)

The first volume in the English series of The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe, this edition contains fully annotated texts by this prolific writer—manuscript letters and poems, monumental projects and ceremonial performances—transcribed from archival resources and artifacts. Presenting Russell's writings not as disparate productions but as elements within a unified authorial program, the edition offers a rich experience of the conventions governing Elizabethan culture and reveals the high degree of self-expression they could afford an innovative author.

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Catherine O'Brien, The Celluloid Madonna: From Scripture to Screen (Columbia University Press, 2011)

The Celluloid Madonna is the first book to analyze the life of the Virgin Mary on screen from the silent era through to the present. For decades, Mary has caught the imagination of filmmakers from a range of religious backgrounds, whether Catholic, Protestant, Muslim, Marxist, or atheist, and film's intersection of theology and secular culture has inspired some of the most singular and controversial visions of this icon in cinema history. Focusing on the challenge of adapting Scripture to the screen, this volume discusses Cecil B. DeMille's The King of Kings (1927), Pier Paolo Pasolini's The Gospel According to St. Matthew (1964), Franco Zeffirelli's Jesus of Nazareth (1977), Jean-Luc Godard's Hail Mary (1984), Jean Delannoy's Mary of Nazareth (1994), Mel Gibson's The Passion of the Christ (2004), Catherine Hardwicke's The Nativity Story (2006), and Mark Dornford-May's Son of Man (2006).

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Sara Upstone, British Asian Fiction: Twenty-first-century Voices (Manchester University Press, 2010)

Is the first text to focus solely on the writing of British writers of South Asian descent born or raised in Britain. Including chapters on Salman Rushdie and V.S. Naipaul, Hani Kureishi, Ravinder Randhawa, Atima Srivastava, nadeem Aslam, Meera Syal, Hari Kunzru, Monica Ali and Suhayl Saadi, the book focuses on the rich diversity of contemporary British Asian experience in order to explore themes such as gender, national and religious identity, post 9-11 Britain, the post-ethnic self, and urban belonging.


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Sara Upstone, Spatial Politics in the Postcolonial Novel (Ashgate, 2009)

Adopts a transnational and comparative approach in order to illuminate the power of spatial locales such as the journey, city, body, and home, in contemporary magical realist postcolonial fiction. While focusing on the texts of Wilson Harris, Toni Morrison, and Salman Rushdie, the book draws on a wide range of literary examples in order to further a case for the 'postcolonial spatial imagination'.

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