Contact us

Dr David Rogers
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Kingston University
Penrhyn Road
Kingston upon Thames
Surrey KT1 2EE

Tel: +44 (0)20 8417 2283
Email: d.rogers@kingston.ac.uk

Staff

The combination of academics, practitioners and publishing professionals makes Kingston Writing School a unique environment in which to further your studies and your career.


Academics

Journalism



Publishing



Creative Writing



English Languages and Linguistics



English Literature



Practitioners

Visiting Professors


  • Samira Ahmed (Journalism and Media)
  • Laura Borras (Digital Media and E-Poetry Theory)
  • John Fuegi (Flare Productions: English Lit & Film)
  • Jo Francis (Flare Productions: English Lit & film)
  • Chancellor Bonnie Greer (Creative Writing and Journalism)

Writers in Residence


  • Mark Barrowcliffe
  • Liz Berry
  • Laura Bridgeman
  • Linda Buckley-Archer
  • Gale Burns
  • Michele Cahill
  • Kayo Chingonyi
  • Tamir Cohen
  • Howard Cunnell
  • Matthew Cunningham
  • Martin Dawes
  • Georgia Fitch
  • Cath Howe
  • Liz Jensen
  • Dina Kafiris
  • Barrie Keeffe
  • Sinead Keegan Emerging Writer in Residence
  • Kathryn Maris
  • Grace McCleen
  • Alan McCormick
  • Kevin McNeil
  • Nicole Miller Emerging Writer in Residence
  • Priscilla Morris
  • Micah Nathan
  • Courttia Newland
  • Mark Norfolk
  • Kate O'Riordan
  • Poppy Sebag-Montifiore
  • Johnny Smith
  • Julia Stuart
  • Agnieszka Studzinska
  • Sue Wallman
  • Ahren Warner

Journalists in Residence


  • Kathryn Corrick
  • Sunny Hundall - Publisher in Residence
  • Sam Jordison - Publisher in Residence
  • Teresa Machan
  • Justine Solomons - Publisher in Residence
  • Jenny Wright aka Wivell - Broadcast Journalist in Residence
Photograph of Charter Quay in Kingston Photograph of a pair of books

What our staff say

Photograph of James Morrison

"I've felt a compulsion to write stories for as long as I can remember. At primary school I would cram ink-blotched exercise books with picaresque chronicles of my weekend adventures. I then progressed through various well-worn phases - absurdist childhood fantasy and (very) adolescent fiction - before finally taming my increasingly florid prose by plumping for a career in journalism. I've never looked back.

"Journalism gave me what I'd long lacked as an aspiring (and frustrated) novelist: discipline. Immovable deadlines, and rules outlawing purple prose, reined me in and taught me to crystallise issues (however complex) precisely and economically. Professionally, I still prefer to write longer, more 'colourful', pieces than tight news stories. But, after years as a jobbing reporter, I can be fairly confident the thoughts I am trying to express come out clearly - and as I intended them."

James Morrison
Senior Lecturer in Journalism